Feature Friday – Minnie

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted here. I’ve been busy over on our facebook page trying to keep everyone updated on a regular basis on what’s happening around on the farm. I’ve also been doing some random posts on What Farming Is webpages too. Neither really gives me an outlet to discuss what’s really going on or how we feel about it. For that reason, I’m back on here! With a new format and new content coming!

Every Friday, I will be doing a feature on one of the critters here at Barrows Farm. I want to be able to explain what each animal is like, how they came to be here and what’s important to us about them. Why do I think this is important? It’s important because as a farm, we wouldn’t be where we are today with each animal here. WordPress also gives me an outlet to hold open discussions with our fans that aren’t allowed on other blogging format. It’s important to us that YOU, the reader, have that ability.

For today’s feature, we are showcasing Minnie. Minnie is the oldest and smallest within our herd. She is an Irish Dexter. Irish Dexters are known for their compact size. They are similar to the miniature cattle seen in other breeds, like Jerseys, but the Dexter’s are traditionally just a smaller, more compact animal.  Minnie is what’s considered a short-legged variety. She’s just a short little thing. I stand 5’8″ tall with a 34″ inseam and she barely reaches my hips. She’s about 36-37″ tall. She’s now 6 years old and has resided with us since September of 2011.

When we purchased her, we didn’t know much about Dexters and thought they looked decent for the breed. How wrong we were! As the years have gone by, she has really come into her own, gain weight, slicked up and is now rather round. It was amazing to see the transformation. Knowing what we do now, we are very glad that we got her when we did.

Minnie has had three calves in that time, all three of them heifers (female). Her first daughter, Mini-Me, had her first calf this year and made Minnie a grandma. All three generations are still here on the farm. Her second calf, Amy, is a Dexter Jersey cross and will be giving birth to her calf Spring of 2015. Her third calf, Minnie-Pearl, was born this last spring. Dexters are great mothers and Minnie is no exception. She is protective of her young, gives them good milk and grows them healthy and strong. She is a herd mother. Many times, you will find her “babysitting” the group of calves. She’s docile and sweet in nature. She’s inquisitive too, smelling around at anything new.

When Minnie came here, she was very frightened of everything. Any noise would send her running in the other direction. She didn’t want to be near people at all. Last winter (2013), we were finally able to pet her back as she lounged in the barn. It takes a long time to earn an animal’s trust, especially when they have never been handled. I wish you could all know that feeling and sense of accomplishment when you can finally touch an animal without them running away in fear.

Minnie is one of our herd favorites for many reasons, including all those listed above. She has a lot of other great traits too. She is compact in size but holds her own in weight. She is very efficient at converting the grasses she consumes to meat and milk. Yes, Dexters are a dual purpose. We love her too because she has given us great offspring that is the base of our herd expansion. She is easy to maintain with no signs of lameness. She’s never been sick since she’s been here. Her hoofs wear down perfectly, causing no need for a hoof trimmer. She steadily holds her weight, even when nursing older calves. Literally, cows just don’t come any better than her. She’s a perfect little Dexter. She loves to play with the calves, run through the pastures kicking up her heels and acting like a kid.

Want to know what else is great? Since she’s a Dexter, she’s part of a breed that is known for it’s longevity! At six years old, she is just getting started in life. We’ve heard lots of great stories about Dexter’s that have lived well over 15 years of age. We are really looking forward to having her around for a very long time to come!

Now, onto what everyone loves to see….PICTURES!

This photo is from Dec. 2011. Minnie is the smaller of the two. Meanie (#43) is a year younger and much taller.
This photo is from Dec. 2011. Minnie is the smaller of the two. Meanie (#43) is a year younger and much taller.
Minnie in 2013 with her first calf born on the farm, Mini-Me.
Minnie in 2013 with her first calf born on the farm, Mini-Me.
Minnie and several of the other Dexters are out playing in the snow. Dexters LOVE days like this and are often found out playing like this.
Minnie and several of the other Dexters are out playing in the snow. Dexters LOVE days like this and are often found out playing like this. Minnie is the center animal.
Look at that face! She is just the sweetest girl.
Look at that face! She is just the sweetest girl.
Minnie is the second from the left. All these animals are standing on a level spot, just over the brink of this field. Her daughter, Mini-Me, is the fourth from the left.
Minnie is the second from the left. All these animals are standing on a level spot, just over the brink of this field. Her daughter, Mini-Me, is the fourth from the left. (Sorry about the poor image quality)
Minnie is the one with her head up, tail curled and looks like she's smiling.
Minnie is the one with her head up, tail curled and looks like she’s in pure bliss.

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5 thoughts on “Feature Friday – Minnie”

  1. I see you had her de-horned. What was your reason? Did you have someone else take care of it for you? Or, did you do it yourselves? How well did that go during the healing process, considering her age and the growth of the horns? She looks so good afterwards, as well! So many end up with scurs popping later. And it’s so frustrating. Seems to be a better way, later, that appears to escape the messy look later on! lol

    1. When the animals came, the used their horns as defense. Instead of risking injury to ourselves and others, we made the difficult choice to dehorn them.
      The dehorning process was a trial, to see how it would work on older animals. The animal welfare standard is to tip them. In my opinion, it still leaves a hazardous object on the front of an animal. We wanted the process to go as smoothly as possible and researched many different methods from crushing, nipping, sawing and ultimately found banding.
      To explain banding, we used castration bands. They were placed around the grove at the base of the horn, next to the skull. We literally had to give them sedatives to do this. Once in place, the bands slowly cut off the circulation within the horn. We did this during the cold months to reduce any risk of infection from flies. Also, during the colder months the blood flow is slowed within the horns and there is less blood flow when the horn falls off.
      It takes between 4-6 weeks before the entire horn just drops off. There was little to no bleeding and the healing process is rather quick. I think I have written about it before in an earlier blog post. I can take a look and post the link for you.

      1. Wonderful! I have let Dwayne read about this. I’ve been so unhappy with results after a year, when we disbud with the burner before they’re 2 months old. I think the way you’re doing it just seems to be a much more humane process that seems to turn out much better results. Thanks for sharing!

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