Tag Archives: dexter cattle

Feature Friday – Minnie

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted here. I’ve been busy over on our facebook page trying to keep everyone updated on a regular basis on what’s happening around on the farm. I’ve also been doing some random posts on What Farming Is webpages too. Neither really gives me an outlet to discuss what’s really going on or how we feel about it. For that reason, I’m back on here! With a new format and new content coming!

Every Friday, I will be doing a feature on one of the critters here at Barrows Farm. I want to be able to explain what each animal is like, how they came to be here and what’s important to us about them. Why do I think this is important? It’s important because as a farm, we wouldn’t be where we are today with each animal here. WordPress also gives me an outlet to hold open discussions with our fans that aren’t allowed on other blogging format. It’s important to us that YOU, the reader, have that ability.

For today’s feature, we are showcasing Minnie. Minnie is the oldest and smallest within our herd. She is an Irish Dexter. Irish Dexters are known for their compact size. They are similar to the miniature cattle seen in other breeds, like Jerseys, but the Dexter’s are traditionally just a smaller, more compact animal.  Minnie is what’s considered a short-legged variety. She’s just a short little thing. I stand 5’8″ tall with a 34″ inseam and she barely reaches my hips. She’s about 36-37″ tall. She’s now 6 years old and has resided with us since September of 2011.

When we purchased her, we didn’t know much about Dexters and thought they looked decent for the breed. How wrong we were! As the years have gone by, she has really come into her own, gain weight, slicked up and is now rather round. It was amazing to see the transformation. Knowing what we do now, we are very glad that we got her when we did.

Minnie has had three calves in that time, all three of them heifers (female). Her first daughter, Mini-Me, had her first calf this year and made Minnie a grandma. All three generations are still here on the farm. Her second calf, Amy, is a Dexter Jersey cross and will be giving birth to her calf Spring of 2015. Her third calf, Minnie-Pearl, was born this last spring. Dexters are great mothers and Minnie is no exception. She is protective of her young, gives them good milk and grows them healthy and strong. She is a herd mother. Many times, you will find her “babysitting” the group of calves. She’s docile and sweet in nature. She’s inquisitive too, smelling around at anything new.

When Minnie came here, she was very frightened of everything. Any noise would send her running in the other direction. She didn’t want to be near people at all. Last winter (2013), we were finally able to pet her back as she lounged in the barn. It takes a long time to earn an animal’s trust, especially when they have never been handled. I wish you could all know that feeling and sense of accomplishment when you can finally touch an animal without them running away in fear.

Minnie is one of our herd favorites for many reasons, including all those listed above. She has a lot of other great traits too. She is compact in size but holds her own in weight. She is very efficient at converting the grasses she consumes to meat and milk. Yes, Dexters are a dual purpose. We love her too because she has given us great offspring that is the base of our herd expansion. She is easy to maintain with no signs of lameness. She’s never been sick since she’s been here. Her hoofs wear down perfectly, causing no need for a hoof trimmer. She steadily holds her weight, even when nursing older calves. Literally, cows just don’t come any better than her. She’s a perfect little Dexter. She loves to play with the calves, run through the pastures kicking up her heels and acting like a kid.

Want to know what else is great? Since she’s a Dexter, she’s part of a breed that is known for it’s longevity! At six years old, she is just getting started in life. We’ve heard lots of great stories about Dexter’s that have lived well over 15 years of age. We are really looking forward to having her around for a very long time to come!

Now, onto what everyone loves to see….PICTURES!

This photo is from Dec. 2011. Minnie is the smaller of the two. Meanie (#43) is a year younger and much taller.
This photo is from Dec. 2011. Minnie is the smaller of the two. Meanie (#43) is a year younger and much taller.
Minnie in 2013 with her first calf born on the farm, Mini-Me.
Minnie in 2013 with her first calf born on the farm, Mini-Me.
Minnie and several of the other Dexters are out playing in the snow. Dexters LOVE days like this and are often found out playing like this.
Minnie and several of the other Dexters are out playing in the snow. Dexters LOVE days like this and are often found out playing like this. Minnie is the center animal.
Look at that face! She is just the sweetest girl.
Look at that face! She is just the sweetest girl.
Minnie is the second from the left. All these animals are standing on a level spot, just over the brink of this field. Her daughter, Mini-Me, is the fourth from the left.
Minnie is the second from the left. All these animals are standing on a level spot, just over the brink of this field. Her daughter, Mini-Me, is the fourth from the left. (Sorry about the poor image quality)
Minnie is the one with her head up, tail curled and looks like she's smiling.
Minnie is the one with her head up, tail curled and looks like she’s in pure bliss.

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Beef Cattle Woes and Wonders

There are some things that I guess I should explain.

I was raised as a small child on a dairy farm. Dairy cattle are what I know the most about. Dairy cattle and Beef cattle are NOT the same thing!
Being raised on a dairy and gathering lots of knowledge over the years does NOT mean that I am an expert either. Somethings I know but there is and always be a ton of stuff I don’t know. There is always new research, new methods, and tweaking to systems. Dairy cattle require different food values than Beef cattle too. High protein, high energy and lots of different nutrients. Don’t get me wrong, Beef cattle still need good food they just require different levels than Dairy cattle.

I have never been around beef cattle until 2011. I don’t know much about them other than they are still cattle. I did a fair amount of research on a couple of different breeds until I found one that I thought was suitable for what I wanted to do. I started my journey into beef way back in 2008. It took 3 years before the breed was found and could be purchased at a reasonable rate. Did I get animals with a pedigree? No, I did not. It has created some issues on it’s own by not having them but they weren’t all that important.

So what’s the breed you ask? Well, Irish Dexter Cattle is what they are. I’ve heard many different takes on how to describe them. Overall and from experience, I will say this. They are a short breed of beef cattle with stout legs and solid feet. The three original cows purchased are 42″, 39″ and 37″ in height. When it comes to frame scores (based on body height at the front shoulder) these ladies don’t even register as a Frame one! They give birth to small calves too. The largest I have seen has been 60 lbs or so. Irish Dexters are efficient grazers that will forage on just about anything, including low protein forages and still have great daily weight gains. Irish Dexters are also a dual purpose cattle too. They can be milked and will give up to around 2-1/2 gallons of milk a day if fed a high protein diet. We do NOT milk them currently.

In the process of learning and building the herd, there are characteristics about them that are not all that wonderful. When you are producing an animal for meat, you want muscle bulk. This is something that the Irish Dexters severely lack in the rear quarters or buttocks region. It’s not that they don’t have muscle, it’s just small. This is something that can be improved through genetics by choosing the right animals to breed them with.

This is the second generation of Irish Dexter on the farm. He is ONE YEAR old in this photo.
As you can see, the rump muscle isn't nearly as rounded as what most beef cattle would have.
As you can see, the rump muscle isn’t nearly as rounded as what most beef cattle would have.

For a year, I have followed Pharo Cattle Company through their facebook  group. I have learned so much from the likes of Kit Pharo, Chip Hines and many others who discuss grazing, drought, genetics and so much more. I’ve been fortunate enough to gain mentors through this similar like-minded people who have established themselves as herd quitters (I’ll explain this more later). Recently, Kit and I have been holding conversations about what kind of options are available when you are breeding an animal like an Irish Dexter to improve the quality of the next generation. This whole process is all about learning for me and I will take all the advice given by him to heart. He probably doesn’t know it but he is also part of the inspiration behind my goal of 365-grazing. I am thankful to have such a great network of people to build knowledge from and the modern technology that allows me to be able to connect with them.

Now, as many of you already know. I’m a strange bird, doing different things and always experimenting with things outside of the box other farmers have built. This is the real reason I starting following and learning from Kit and others like him. Kit has come up with a name for those of us who don’t follow the “herd” and do what everyone else is doing. As I mentioned before, Herd Quitters, is the name appropriated used. He told me the other day, there is a phrase that fits me to the T.  His Cowboy Logic for me: “If you’re doing what everyone else is doing, you will never be better than average.”

I don’t want to be average, far from it actually. I want to be different. I want to try new things, not only in life but with the farm.  I want people to visit and say, “WOW! Can you believe that?!?!”  I don’t have everything figured out and probably never will create the perfect situation for everyone but I can keep working to create better for me and for me to be better. I can continue to work to develop animals that are efficient grazers. I can continue to develop and improve the land I work. I can continue to tweak what I do with rotational grazing. I can continue to work harder, develop more and still keep my feet firmly planted.

To end this message, the meaning of being a herd quitter:  “The term “Herd Quitter” refers to people who have enough courage to break away from the status-quo, herd-mentality way of thinking. It is more about thinking for yourself than anything else. Following the crowd and doing what everyone else is doing – WITHOUT KNOWING WHY – has never been the best way to manage your business. If you are doing what everyone else is doing, you will never be better than average.”

I think this should also include that is not the best way to manage business or life! And I couldn’t agree more!

Here’s to the Herd Quitters… The crazy ones… The rebels… The troublemakers… The square pegs in a world full of round holes… They see things differently… They have no respect for the status quo… They make things happen… If it weren’t for the Herd Quitters, the earth would still be flat… While some call them crazy, we see genius… Those who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones that do… Dare to be different… Dare to be a Herd Quitter!